Posts by Noah R. Taylor

Tatsumi Review

Part biography, part short story compilation, Tatsumi animates the life and selected works of mangaka Yoshihiro Tatsumi in a film that will please fans and newcomers alike.

Interview: Christopher Heron of The Seventh Art

A look inside the process of independently producing the newest format of web content: the video magazine. The Seventh Art offers an alternative to traditional film analysis with in-depth interviews, video essays and profiles achieved with a precision that makes them archival-worthy. Founder Christopher Heron talked to us a bit about the impetus behind the magazine and the state of online film exploration.

Interview: Peter Bogdanovich

The words “nervous” and “anxious” do not do justice to what I was experiencing as I sat in what is probably the swankiest private screening room in Toronto (located in Yorkville’s Hazelton Hotel) waiting to interview the fantastic Mr. Bogdanovich. Since our camera fell through at the last minute, we were armed only with a Fostex FR-2 sound recorder, a microphone bigger than most modern cameras, and a hope that he’d appreciate the old-school nature of the apparatus.

The Odds Review

It’s rare that a thriller comes along and pulls you into the world of a movie in a way that really makes you experience the protagonist's fear. Try as it might, The Odds is not one of those rare exceptions. Set against the oxymoronic backdrop of a “high stakes high school gambling ring” the story spins a semi-decent mystery but suffers from a lack of logic and sympathetic characters we can identify with.

Doppelganger Paul Review

At one time or another, most of us have heard an acquaintance say “I swear I saw your doppelgänger the other day, this guy/girl looked exactly like you.” Or perhaps you’ve been that apparent “doppelgänger” and were mistaken for someone else. However it’s rare that we ever spot someone whom we consider to be our own double, which is the premise of Doppelgänger Paul, an offbeat Canadian comedy with a darkly dry humour that blindsides the viewer at its best moments.

Moon Point Review

An underdog story both thematically and in its making, Moon Point has you rooting for the characters and filmmakers alike. Since Canadian features, particularly the independents, usually end up seen by few if any, this one should be considered a victory just by virtue of you reading about it here. Fortunately the film does succeed in that it delivers a bit of fluffy entertainment, which is all most really ask for when going to the movies.

The Divide Review

The Divide is a psychological thriller about post-apocalyptic survival that is often horrifying and all around nightmarish. From claustrophobia to torture, radiation sickness and murder, this movie is intentionally void of anything that makes an audience feel comfortable or at ease for longer than one or two brief moments. On this level it's an achievement, but ultimately the story suffers from a shapeless script.

Academy Lists 97 Eligible Film Scores

There are several categories for the Oscars with very particular qualification standards. Original Score is clearly one of them as only 97 films qualify this year. With less than 100 possibilities and the Academy being categorically opposed to surprising people, it shouldn’t be very difficult to pick out the scores that will be nominated (including movies like Chipwrecked in the running also helps narrow the field).

TADFF 2011
The Divide Review

The Divide is a psychological thriller about post-apocalyptic survival that is often horrifying and all around nightmarish. From claustrophobia to torture, radiation sickness and murder, the only thing comfortable about this movie was how snugly it fit into the middle of Toronto After Dark’s line-up.

First Man of Steel Image

It’s a spider-man! It’s an iron man! No, it’s a super man! Earlier today Warner Bros. released the first image of Superman from Zack Snyder’s upcoming Man of Steel slated for a 2013 release. The image shows Henry Cavill as the titular 'Man of Steel' showing off the squareness of his jaw in a suit that replaces the vintage spandex look with the recycled basketball one people seem to really like these days.

Good Canadian Cinema?

When was the last time you saw a good Canadian film? How many Canadian films can most people even name? Maybe that’s because unlike music and television, there are no government enforced quotas for Canadian content in our movie theatres, allowing Hollywood to dominate our screens. the city’s newest rep theatre, the Toronto Underground Cinema is taking long overdue measures to remedy this. Starting this Thursday, the Underground is dedicating all 8 of its weekend screenings to great Canadian films.

TIFF 2010
Fubar II Review

As much as I always loved the first Fubar movie, I was very skeptical when I found out they were premiering the sequel at this year’s festival. To mix metaphors, I thought they were returning to the well to milk a dead cow. Fortunately there was enough water left in the well to keep the cow alive and ready to be milked for our viewing pleasure once again!

TIFF 2010
The Illusionist Review

The Illusionist is director Sylvain Chomet's follow-up to the hugely successful The Triplets of Belleville, and while he is able to top his previous efforts' aesthetic beauty and craftsmanship, the story is perhaps too subtle and minimal to really draw viewers in.

TIFF 2010
Boxing Gym Review

It is with a combined sense of shame and excitement when I admit that I had only seen one Frederick Wiseman film in its entirety prior to screening his latest gem, Boxing Gym. Shame because I could name a dozen titles of his recommended by as many people, and excitement because this film has motivated me to finally donate some time to the observational cinema of this true auteur.

TIFF 2010
Peep World Review

Peep World is about a family full of hatred for one another getting together to celebrate the patriarch’s 70th birthday. Unfortunately, depicting 24 hours with 14 characters rehashing one family’s entire history is far beyond the scope of this 90 minute film. So many things are breezed over and simplified that the viewer is left […]

TIFF 2010
Easy Money Review

Easy Money (Snabba Cash) is easy viewing for anyone who likes a good crime story that examines the relationship between gangs, drugs and big business. Set in Stockholm where organized crime is still relatively young, the film follows three very different protagonists who all become vested in one big drug shipment. Jorge is a recently […]